All About Cerebro

What is Cerebro?

Cerebro’s Marketplace is an online platform -- via a mobile app or desktop browsers -- for clinicians and hospitals to quickly and easily find each other. Besides that, Cerebro offers several labor management software solutions to hospitals.

Is Cerebro a staffing agency?

No. Cerebro makes it easier for hospitals and clinicians to find each other, without the headache of traditional staffing agency commissions or phone trees.

How does it work, then? Who pays Cerebro?

Unlike traditional agencies which can take commissions up to 40%, Cerebro takes a small, flat service fee from hospitals for each hour a clinician provides services through the Marketplace. This means higher pay for professionals, and a happier labor force for hospitals.

Where are your services available?

Cerebro’s Marketplace is currently showing opportunities in Los Angeles County. We expect to launch in the rest of Southern California, plus Northern California, Las Vegas, and Phoenix soon. Stay tuned!

I’m not a registered nurse. Can I use your app?

Soon! Cerebro is currently developing its system to work with clinicians such as certified nurses assistants, licensed vocational nurses, and other non-licensed healthcare personnel. Please visit us again (and often!) to learn more.
 

Verification

Can I sign up and work for a hospital the next day?

Not quite. Before clinicians use the Marketplace, they undergo a verification process. The process typically includes a license verification (if applicable), certification/credential check, background check, drug test, competency check, and health screening. The process is largely based on the criteria of the hospital where the clinician wants to work.

What are you verifying?

Patient safety is Cerebro’s highest priority. Our goal is to make sure that each hospital has enough information to determine that the clinician is who they say they are - meaning they have the licensure, experience, and background necessary to work.

How long does verification take?

Assuming the clinician is eager to start, verification can be done quickly. To a large extent, the timing depends on several milestones: how quickly the candidate completes the drug screen and background consent form; and how quickly the screening and background check results are returned.
 

Employment Status

Are you an employer?

No. Cerebro does not hire clinicians, unlike traditional staffing agencies. Instead, Cerebro invites clinicians to sign up as independent contractors on the Marketplace.

What is an independent contractor?

An independent contractor is someone who is self-employed, meaning the person works for him or herself. You control the work done, provide equipment or equipment required to perform the job (e.g., stethoscope), have appropriate insurance (including medical malpractice and workman’s compensation), and have the skills, required experience, and documentation to perform the job.

What is the difference between being an independent contractor and being an employee?

Unlike an independent contractor, an employee is a worker whose actions, as well as end result, are controlled by the employer. The hours worked, where the work happens, how the work is done – all of it is defined by the employer.

Why care about the difference?

Cerebro wants to change the way contingent clinicians work with and in healthcare systems. To do that, clinicians are empowered to visit the Marketplace and choose placement opportunities for themselves, based on desired facility and specialty.
 

Compensation

How do I get paid?

Clinicians must apply for and be placed at a hospital. If the hospital selects the professional, he or she will be paid for the hours of work provided. Clincians are paid every two weeks.

How can you afford to pay nurses that much?

Our Marketplace makes it easier and faster for hospitals to find the clinicians they want, and for those professionals to find the job opportunities they want. Those efficiencies mean more money for professionals.

What about overtime, non-taxable allowances, stipends, or other benefits? What do you offer?*

No more confusing messages about taxable versus nontaxable stipends or other carved out allowances. Because clinicians serve as independent contractors, clinicians receive the full amount in their paychecks. No deductions!

What about taxes? Or health insurance?

As an independent contractor, your taxes are not withheld by the federal or state government. This means that it is your responsibility to file taxes at each quarter, and/or the end of each year. To help manage tax costs, we partnered with Painless1099, which can automatically separate money for taxes every time you get paid. Click here for more information.
We understand that clinicians may want more information about how to handle taxes or health insurance as an independent contractor. To help, below are several resources clinicians may want to visit:
  StrideHealth: individual and family health insurance plans

  IRS Sharing Economy Tax Center

  Intuit and HR Block can also be helpful resources.


* Cerebro does not provide tax advice. We encourage you to consult a tax professional for assistance reporting your income.

Do you provide workers’ compensation?

We ask that nurses provide proof of their own workers’ compensation coverage.

Do you provide medical malpractice insurance coverage?

Nurses must provide proof of their own medical malpractice insurance. If you do not carry any, it is easy to obtain it. Resources include NSO, Mercer (which provides discounts for ANA members), and HPSO. Cerebro is providing this list as potential resources only. By listing them, Cerebro is not endorsing any one of them.
 

Providers

Do you work with facilities besides hospitals?

Currently, Cerebro is focused on working with large hospital systems.

Agencies and hospitals sometimes use similar words but mean different things. What do you mean by…

An independent contractor is someone who is self-employed, meaning the person works for him or herself. You control the work done, provide equipment or equipment required to perform the job (e.g., stethoscope), have appropriate insurance (including medical malpractice and workman’s compensation), and have the skills, required experience, and documentation to perform the job.
  Clinicians: healthcare professionals, including registered nurses, certified nurses assistants, licensed vocational nurses, and other non-licensed healthcare personnel.

  Contingent Clinicians/Staff: Contractor: generally, a clinician who works on a temporary basis at a hospital. The term might be short (one shift) or long (weeks). Per Diem: generally, a clinician who works temporarily for a very short (e.g., one shift) amount of time at a hospital.

  Marketplace: the online platform provided by Cerebro that helps hospitals and clinicians quickly and easily find each other.